My Harlingen News Rotating Header Image

Weekly Wisdoms

Are you so busy working for God that you never spend any time with God?

It is easy to justify doing good works for God as a substitute for spending real, intimate, quality, personal time with God. For example, a youth pastor may spend many hours planning events for kids—preparing the music, setting up the games, arranging the transportation, and even preparing a brief message. However, none of that is a substitute for spending personal time with God—reading the Bible, praying, seeking God’s guidance, worshiping, and just sitting in His presence.

Unfortunately, many people are often so caught up in other activities that we use them as an excuse for not spending time with God. Instead, they need to make a firm decision to put God first in our lives. For example, King David, who certainly had many opportunities to fill his time with other activities, knew that spending time with God is an absolute necessity—a vital need. In Psalm 27:4, he said that God was the most important thing in his life: One thing I ask of the LORD, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the LORD and to seek him in his temple.

Indeed, Jesus declared that if we seek God, he will take care of the rest of the things in our lives: “Seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well” (Matthew 6:33). In your life, put God first, and he will take care of “all these things.”Follow David’s example: make God the “one thing” you need. That way, you won’t be so busy working for God that you never spend any time with God.

The type of seed you sow determines the type of harvest you’ll reap.

Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously (2 Corinthians 9:6). This verse clearly states that whatever seed you sow determines the harvest you’ll reap. In other words, you can’t expect to reap good rewards if you sow bad seeds.

Proverbs 11:18 says, The wicked man earns deceptive wages, but he who sows righteousness reaps a sure reward. Likewise, he who sows wickedness reaps trouble (Proverbs 22:8).

Even when things may appear to be going poorly and it doesn’t look like you’ll ever reap a good harvest, this principle of sowing and reaping remains true. If you Sow for yourselves righteousness, then you will reap the fruit of unfailing love (Hosea 10:12).

You may have to wait a bit to reap that harvest; in fact, you may even need to wait a long time — maybe many, many years — for a harvest. As Galatians 6:7-8 says, you will reap what you sow: Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows. The one who sows to please his sinful nature, from that nature will reap destruction; the one who sows to please the Spirit, from the Spirit will reap eternal life.

This Biblical principle of sowing and reaping is nicely summarized by Obadiah 1:15: As you have done, it will be done to you; your deeds will return upon your own head.

Therefore, sow good seeds; then, after you wait upon the Lord, you will reap a far better harvest.

 

Leave a Reply

Our weather forecast is from Wordpress Weather